SvelteKit 🤝 Storybook

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Storybook 🤝 SvelteKit

Here at Mainmatter we're fans of SvelteKit and use it to build ambitious projects with the teams we work with. Storybook was the obvious choice to make the onboarding for new devs seamless and allow all project stakeholders to follow the development of the internal design system. There was just a small problem...

anchorThe Problem

Storybook has a wonderful Story (pun intended) with Svelte, but the integration with SvelteKit was a bit more challenging. SvelteKit is a full-stack framework and provides a lot of virtual exports that give your application the needed information about its current state. An example of this is the page store. It gives you information about the route you are on, the data you returned from the server, etc.

But when your component is showcased in Storybook it doesn't actually run in SvelteKit, which means that the page store is empty.

Granted that using SvelteKit-specific stores inside components is generally considered a bad practice (you could just pass the store value as a prop), sometimes it is just tedious having to pass a prop every time. For example, if you are dealing with i18n, you can return the detected locale from the root layout so that every page has access to it. Can you imagine having to pass the locale prop to every component when you could just use $page.data.locale?

anchorThe Solution

Luckily for us, SvelteKit is just a Vite plugin and Storybook allows you to add any Vite plugins to the default ones. Writing a Vite is not that complex, and to make this work we just need to override the alias config of Vite to point every import from $app/stores to a file that exports the same functions and stores. This way, if you are running your component in a SvelteKit application, Svelte will provide those stores, if you run your component in Storybook, the file you specify in the alias will provide them.

anchorUnveiling parameters.sveltekit_experimental

As we've seen, it's possible to mimic the SvelteKit behavior in user-land. But if you have to write all of this code every time you want to use Storybook in your SvelteKit application, wouldn't it be better to have this provided by Storybook itself? That was exactly my thought. At Mainmatter we love to give back to the open source that we use every day and we even have a whole day every week to work on open source projects. So I got in touch with JReinhold and after a quick chat, we decided that this was a good addition for the @storybook/sveltekit and I got to work.

As of Storybook v7.6, if you are using the SvelteKit integration, you can now specify a new set of parameters for each Story that will allow you to control the values of those exports. Let's explore how to use this new feature and what benefits it brings to the table.

P.s. here's the link to the PR if you are curious on how all of this was implemented.

anchorHow to Use It

As you may know, in Storybook you can export the default value from Button.stories.ts like this:

const meta = {
  title: "Example/Button",
  component: Button,
  argTypes: {
    backgroundColor: { control: "color" },
    size: {
      control: { type: "select" },
      options: ["small", "medium", "large"],
    },
  },
} satisfies Meta<Button>;

and then export a Story object like this:

export const Primary: Story = {
  args: {
    primary: true,
    label: "Button",
  },
};

Each one of these objects has a parameters property that is usually used by various addons and plugin to customize their behavior. On this object, you can add a sveltekit_experimental property to use this new feature (yes, it's experimental in v7.6 it will probably be out of experimental by v8 which should also introduce support for Svelte 5). Let's see how it looks:

export const Primary: Story = {
  args: {
    primary: true,
    label: "Button",
  },
  parameters: {
    sveltekit_experimental: {
      stores: {
        page: {}, // this mocks the page store
        navigating: {}, // this mocks the navigating store
        update: true, // this mocks the update store
      },
      navigation: {
        goto: () => {}, // this is a callback for the goto method
        invalidate: () => {}, // this is a callback for the invalidate method
        invalidateAll: () => {}, // this is a callback for the invalidateAll method
        afterNavigate: {}, // this will be the object passed to `afterNavigate` on mount
      },
      forms: {
        enhance: () => {}, // this is a callback for enhance
      },
      hrefs: {
        "/test": {
          callback: () => {}, // this is a called when a link to /test is clicked
        },
        "/test/.+": {
          callback: () => {}, // this is a called when a link that match /test/.+ is clicked
          asRegex: true,
        },
      },
    },
  },
};

well...this was a lot of information packed into a small snippet of code. The gist of it is that you have three properties, one for every module exported from $app plus an href property. So, for example, to customize the behavior of the page store exported from $app/stores, you can set sveltekit_experimental.stores.page, or to customize the behavior of the goto function exported from $app/navigation, you can set sveltekit_experimental.navigation.goto.

Let's see what you can customize.

anchorstores.page

The object you assign to this property will be the value of the page store. You are free to assign only a partial (what you need in the story)

export const Primary: Story = {
  args: {
    primary: true,
    label: "Button",
  },
  parameters: {
    sveltekit_experimental: {
      stores: {
        page: {
          data: {
            locale: "en",
          },
        },
      },
    },
  },
};

anchorstores.navigating

The object you assign to this property will be the value of the navigating store. You are free to assign only a partial (what you need in the story).

export const Primary: Story = {
  args: {
    primary: true,
    label: "Button",
  },
  parameters: {
    sveltekit_experimental: {
      stores: {
        navigating: {
          to: {
            route: {
              id: "/test-route/[id]",
            },
          },
        },
      },
    },
  },
};

anchorstores.update

The object you assign to this property will be the value of the update store. The value of the store is a boolean.

export const Primary: Story = {
  args: {
    primary: true,
    label: "Button",
  },
  parameters: {
    sveltekit_experimental: {
      stores: {
        update: false,
      },
    },
  },
};

anchornavigation.goto

The function you assign to this property will be called whenever the Story you are rendering calls goto. You will receive the same parameters passed to the goto function by the component. If you don't pass any function to this, Storybook will log an action in the actions panel.

export const Primary: Story = {
  args: {
    primary: true,
    label: "Button",
  },
  parameters: {
    sveltekit_experimental: {
      navigation: {
        goto: (to, options) => {
          console.log("The user tried to navigate to", to);
        },
      },
    },
  },
};

anchornavigation.invalidate

The function you assign to this property will be called whenever the Story you are rendering calls invalidate. You will receive the same parameters passed to the invalidate function by the component. If you don't pass any function to this, Storybook will log an action in the actions panel.

export const Primary: Story = {
  args: {
    primary: true,
    label: "Button",
  },
  parameters: {
    sveltekit_experimental: {
      navigation: {
        invalidate: (toInvalidate, options) => {
          console.log("The user invalidated", toInvalidate);
        },
      },
    },
  },
};

anchornavigation.invalidateAll

The function you assign to this property will be called whenever the Story you are rendering calls invalidateAll. If you don't pass any function to this, Storybook will log an action in the actions panel.

export const Primary: Story = {
  args: {
    primary: true,
    label: "Button",
  },
  parameters: {
    sveltekit_experimental: {
      navigation: {
        invalidateAll: () => {
          console.log("The user called invalidatedAll");
        },
      },
    },
  },
};

anchornavigation.afterNavigate

Generally, afterNavigate is called by SvelteKit after each navigation. This doesn't really make sense in Storybook since there's no router involved. Instead, if you call afterNavigate in your component, the function you passed as a parameter will be called on mount. The function you pass takes the information about the navigation as an argument and you can specify that argument using navigation.afterNavigate (you may also pass a partial).

export const Primary: Story = {
  args: {
    primary: true,
    label: "Button",
  },
  parameters: {
    sveltekit_experimental: {
      navigation: {
        afterNavigate: {
          from: {
            route: {
              id: "/",
            },
          },
        },
      },
    },
  },
};

anchorforms.enhance

If you are using the enhance action on a form when inside Storybook, the form submission will still be prevented and the function you assign to forms.enhance will be called.

export const Primary: Story = {
  args: {
    primary: true,
    label: "Button",
  },
  parameters: {
    sveltekit_experimental: {
      forms: {
        enhance: () => {
          console.log("The user submitted a form");
        },
      },
    },
  },
};

anchorhrefs

By default, every link will log an action to the Actions panel, but if you want you can pass another property to the sveltekit_experimental parameter. hrefs is an object where every key is a string that should represent a link inside your Story, and the value is typed as such: { callback: () => void, asRegex?: boolean }. As you might have guessed, the callback function will be called whenever the user clicks on an A tag that has a href equal to the key. If you specified asRegex as true, the function will be called whenever your regular expression matches the href attribute of the tag.

anchorConclusions

And that was it: this was a brief introduction to the new features, and I'm sure you will find crazy ways to use those functionalities. I'm so happy to have been able to contribute to such a pivotal project, and more so to be able to use those features myself! Also, I want to thank Jeppe for helping me become familiar with this huge codebase.

anchor If you're looking to adopt Svelte and SvelteKit and need guidance along the way, reach out!

We can help with mentoring, training, team augmentation, and custom development.

Contact us!
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